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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

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TABLE 8
Mean Scores of Occupation and Income by Age for Migratory Status Groups,3 Monterrey Men, 1965
				First	
Short	Medium	Long	Natives	Gen-	Second
Exposure	Exposure	Exposure	by	eration	Generation
Age             Migrants	Migrants	Migrants	Adoption	Natives	Natives
OCCUPATIONAL LEVELb
21-30	1.26	1.70	-	1.58	1.54	2.14
31-40	1.25	1.43	1.65	2.04	1.82	2.73
41-50	1.32	1.41	2.15	2.07	1.96	2.40
51-60	.91	.81	1.83	1.98	1.85	2.55
Probability, age controlled0		.55	.00	.94              .94	.00	
Grand mean	1.21	1.33	1.94	1.87	1.76	2.40
Probability,						
age not controlled0		.61	.00	.65              .50	.00	
WEEKLY INCOMEd						
21-30	2.25	2.89	_	2.55	3.00	3.40
31-40	2.25	2.96	3.23	3.76	3.53	4.58
41-50	2.81	3.03	4.00	3.78	4.05	4.43
51-60	1.83	1.72	3.50	3.88	3.16	4.28
Probability, age						
controlled0		.15	.00	.71              .53	.03	
Grand mean	2.32	2.69	3.62	3.34	3.41	4.07
Probability,						
age not controlled0		.06	.00	.21               .74	.00	
aSee Table 7.
bA 6-point scale ranging from 0 (unskilled workers) to 6 (managers and professionals). cNull hypothesis that the difference between adjacent Migratory Status Groups is due to chance.
^A 9-point scale with unequal intervals, 0 to 8.
Source: Monterrey Mobility Study, actual sample.
directly and indirectly. Directly, because rural migrants to large cities do better occupationally than those who remain in rural areas. Indirectly, because the influx of rural migrants into the lower ranks of the occupational hierarchy creates additional opportunities for upward mobility for the natives. Blau and Duncan found support for this argument in their American data, and it is reasonable to assume that in general the pattern will hold in large cities of developing countries.* A rigorous test of the Blau and Duncan
*Parenthetically, the Blau and Duncan interpretation is in harmony with that of Lipset and Bendix (44) who argue that immigration from Europe to the United Statesonsidering the important rural component of much of the in-migration to these cities. Whatever the socio-economic ranking of migrants and natives, the point to be stressed is that both groups are lower than is desirable.